AHIQ – Summer’s End Quilt

In my last post, a Sentimental Journey, I filled you in on what’s been happening in my life the past few months. I had sketched a pretty good (for me) version of a wilting sunflower, and had an idea how to translate it into fabric. Once home, I decided to do an improv-pieced background and place my sunflower image on top of it. It turns out that the background I came up with was, actually, composed of two different improv ‘blocks’.

For the upper part of the background, the ‘sky’ I used strip piecing similar to a couple of earlier projects. I hand cut strips in a more or less consistent width, then stitch them end to end, in a fairly random order, then cut them into lengths equal to the width of the piece I need, then stitch them together side by side. For this project I used a variety of commercial fabrics, including some textural prints, and ginghams and shirting plaids, all in shades of blue.

 

For the “ground”, I put together some Sujata-Shah-style stack-and-cut strips of wedge shapes, also using different textures and shirting plaids, this time in brown and gold colors. They represent a late-summer field of dried grass, or corn stalks.

Here is a progress photo of the background piecing.

I sandwiched and quilted the background first, using a few different variegated Sulky threads, in golds, yellows, browns and greens, using a walking foot.

Then, I made a cartoon of my sunflower sketch, enlarged to fit the size of the piece (20″ by 30″) and cut out all the pieces from several hand-dyed fabrics and batiks. These were fused in place, edge-stitched, and embellished with more stitching, some free-motion, some not, in stages building from the background of the image to the front. The last step was to enhance some of the shapes with shadowing. For this I used Derwent Inktense® pencils and a fine-tipped ‘water brush’ to control the amount of water and prevent it spreading beyond the edges where I wanted it to be.  I used facings rather than bindings on the edges, which has become my preferred mode for these little art quilts. It makes a nice, clean edge that hangs flat to the wall.

One disappointment with the finished piece is that although the stitches do not, the lines of the quilting showed through the applique a bit. This is especially noticeable in the photo, though it is not so much in person.  But I am generally pleased with the finished piece. Even though technically, summer has just begun, here is Summer’s End, all done and ready to share. 

Linking up with AHIQ over at Ann’s and Kaja’s.

Thank you for stopping by!

Sue

 

Advertisements

A Sentimental Journey

I see that my last blog post was on March 28, when I posted about the (non) progress of my original “Coin Toss” piecing, and a spinoff of another piece I am working on which I was not ready to share. Around this time, my private life took a bit of a detour, and I took an enforced break from which I am only now returning. But I had been excited about the AHIQ challenge this year, and encouraged by the collegial nature of the group of quilters who are part of it, especially by Ann and Kaja. I have been lurking online, reading all the posts, following your progress, and making the occasional comment. Finally, I am ready to share.

Mom on Mount Tam

On May 10, 2017, I lost my dear mother, my biggest fan, and my best friend. Mom was my most faithful reader. She followed my blog from Day #1, and never failed to read my posts and comment on them, privately, to me, in e-mails or in one of our frequent phone calls. She loved everything I ever made. Here is a picture of her smiling at my camera, on a sunny day in 2015, when I took her for a drive up to the top of Mt. Tamalpais. The little quilt of Mt. Tam (my very first art quilt and the banner on my blog) hung on the wall in her apartment, where she could see it every day from her favorite perch on the sofa. It represented the view from our front room when I was young. It now hangs once again in my studio.

I was privileged to be able to spend the last several weeks living with her. She had enjoyed a very full, and happy life, and was very independent. When she finally decided to ask for our help, there was not much for my two brothers and I to do but just be with her. There was no real illness, only age and weakness. She was mentally present and articulate about being grateful for what she had had, and also about being ready to go when God called her. Her passing was graceful, accepting and peaceful, and her children were with her. One can only hope to come to such an end. We whom she left behind will miss her every day.

***

Earlier in the year, my art quilting group had set a couple of challenges for the membership. The first challenge was “Flowers” and was due in June. I was not excited about making a quilt with a flower theme, but during the time I was staying with Mom, while going through things in the apartment, I came across my Dad’s stash of art supplies. There was a sketchbook, and some oil pastels. I decided to play with them one evening and made a sketch/drawing of an idea I’d had in my head of wilting flowers. I thought about Mom, also wilting, and what kind of flower she would have been. I decided on a sunflower, for several reasons. She was my Mom, thus larger than life to me; she was born at the end of August, in the hot days at the end of summer; and she was a blonde, all the time I was growing up. So I made a sketch of a sunflower, past her prime, in a simmering-hot summer sun. My drawing abilities are not great, but I was pleased with this sketch. I decided it might be a suitable subject for a small art quilt.

I will leave you with the sketch I made, but I will be back for AHIQ to share the quilt that came from it.

IMG_3749

Thanks for sticking with me.

Sue